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KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI – Eduardo de Souza Ribeiro, a doctoral student in animal sciences at the University of Florida, today received the National Milk Producers Federation Richard M. Hoyt Award for dairy-related research. 

Ribeiro was recognized during the awards ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association in Kansas City. NMPF Vice President for Dairy Foods and Nutrition Beth Briczinski made the scholarship presentation.

A native of São Joaquim, Brazil, Ribeiro (pictured at right) has done extensive research in reproductive physiology and management of dairy cows. He earned a master’s degree from the University of Florida in 2011 and is currently in the animal molecular and cellular biology program there. His research has resulted in 24 publications, of which he was the lead author on eight.

Briczinski called Ribeiro an exemplary student who has already made significant contributions to the U.S. dairy industry. “In light of his ongoing work to advance dairy science, Eduardo richly deserves this award,” she said.  

The Richard M. Hoyt Award is a joint project of NMPF and ADSA, with NMPF providing the scholarship money. The award recognizes research efforts with direct application to problems in the dairy industry. The winner must be enrolled in or have completed a program leading to an advance degree in dairy science, dairy production, diary processing or a similar curriculum.

The National Milk Producers Federation on July 14 endorsed a draft plan for allowing the U.S. and Canada to cope with an outbreak of a serious foreign animal contagion, such as foot-and-mouth disease, suggesting the plan is a template for similar plans involving other important dairy export markets.

The plan, drafted by the Agriculture Department’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, calls for the United States and Canada to recognize each other’s efforts to control an outbreak, while regionalizing how the outbreak is handled, so as to allow continued trade with disease-free areas of the country.

In comments filed with APHIS Monday, NMPF, the voice of 32,000 dairy farmers in Washington, noted that Canada is the second-largest export market for U.S. dairy products, and that an outbreak of a highly contagious animal disease such as FMD in either country could be catastrophic for the U.S. dairy industry.

“We applaud the Agriculture Department for working with its Canadian counterparts to prepare for a foreign animal disease outbreak,” said Jamie Jonker, NMPF’s vice president for sustainability & scientific affairs. “We fully support the draft plan and see it as an effective tool for dealing with an outbreak.”

CEO’S CORNER


Jim Mulhern
NMPF President
& CEO
 
July 1, 2014
 
To no one’s great surprise, President Obama recently confirmed what has long been suspected here in Washington:  the chances of Congress passing immigration reform legislation in 2014 have gone from slim to none.  Late last month, the President said Speaker John Boehner informed him the House of Representatives will not move forward with the issue this year. 

Introducing the New Margin Protection Program

It took five years of work, but Congress finally responded by including a new Dairy Producer Margin Protection Program in the 2014 farm bill. The 950-page bill does feature the most significant rewrite of dairy policy in more than a generation, based on idea developed by NMPF's members. The program will help address the volatility in farmers’ milk prices, as well as feed costs. 
The MPP is schedule to be implemented by the USDA by Sept. 1, 2014.


Use our website www.futurefordairy.com to read about what the new program is, why it was needed, and, most importantly in the months ahead, how it is being implemented.

 

NEW:  A regular, detailed update on the margins between milk prices and feed costs can be downloaded from the Margin Protection Program page.

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